History of Trick-or-Treat

Since your parents started dressing you in that (totally awesome) pumpkin costume, you’ve associated Halloween with trick-or-treating. But just how did it all start? Here’s some history about how trick-or-treat came to be, from us here at DeVoe Buick GMC.

The term “trick-or-treat” was only coined in 1951, when it was made popular by the Peanuts comic strip. However, that’s not the origin of the actual practice of trick-or-treating. Back in the Middle Ages, people would dress up as ghosts or demons and would perform “tricks” for food and drinks.Trick-or-Treat

In later centuries, young people in Scotland and Ireland would dress up (called “guising”) and go door to door, telling jokes or singing songs in exchange for a treat of some sort.

Guy Fawkes Day was a celebratory holiday in England. In the 19th century, children began dressing up as Fawkes (a famous conspirator) and asking people for “a penny for the Guy”.

In the United States, trick-or-treating spawned from the American colonists who celebrated Guy Fawkes Day as well as the Irish and Scottish who practiced their tradition of “guising”. Pranking on Halloween became a common practice during the 1920’s, which ending up leading to the “trick-or-treat” practice.

After a short halt on trick-or-treating during WWII, it became popular again during the postwar baby boom. And we’ve been trick-or-treating ever since!

Thanksgiving Road Trip Tips

ThanksgivingThanksgiving Day and weekend typically have horrible traffic, so if you’re planning on taking a road trip out of town, it’s important to keep these Thanksgiving road trip tips in mind.

Auto-related deaths on Thanksgiving have generally less to do with drunk driving and more about long distances and heavy traffic. Try to leave early on your trip, since other drivers will be less drowsy and there will be fewer of them on the road, but you should also avoid leaving earlier than you would normally get up in the morning. Driving too early in the morning isn’t any better than driving at night—you’ll still be sleepy and off your game.

Another thing to look out for is stress. The holidays can take a lot out of us, and getting everyone together for a several-hour road trip with the prospect of dealing with relatives isn’t the most exciting. Heavy traffic just increases stress, so you just have to avoid letting it get the better of you and causing you to drive recklessly. And be watchful of other stressed-out drivers!

When packing food and luggage in the car, make sure everything is secured and won’t move. If you do get in a wreck or even just come to a sudden stop and there are heavy, loose items around, it could seriously injure you or a passenger.

Bring plenty of games, handheld devices, audiobooks, and regular books to keep your kids entertained on the trip. Avoid driving after you eat turkey, especially at night—the Tryptophan in turkey makes you drowsy. If you can, stay with your relatives.